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Study Pre-Medical Sciences in the Caribbean at WUSOM

The five and a half year MD program is designed for high school graduates intending to obtain a MD Degree. Upon successful completion of 4 semesters of premedical courses, students are automatically allowed to complete the Basic Medical Science (preclinical) portion of the degree program with their counterparts in the 4-Year MD degree program.

Pre-Med I

Introduction to Medical Sciences

Pre-Med II

Anatomy, Psychology & More

Pre-Med III

Understanding Basic Medical Sciences

Pre-Med IV

Hands-On Experience in Biology, Chemistry & More

Pre-Med I: Introduction to Medical Sciences

Here we provide a brief overview of Windsor University School of Medicine’s Pre-Med I curriculum. Students receive a rich and diverse foundation in preparation for Pre-Med II and Pre-Med III. For more information, download our brochure, or call or email us today.

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BIO 100 – BASIC BIOLOGY WITH LAB

Biology is an introduction to the study of living things and their interdependence with the environment. Students will explore biological sciences from a fundamental cellular unit of life to a multi-cellular organism by recognizing and understanding its basic structure, function, growth, metabolism, reproduction, inheritance, and evolution.


This course will prepare students with an introductory basic science foundation for further disciplines within biology. Here students will learn to make connections across all diverse topics of biology using various resources.

GEC 105 – GENERAL CHEMISTRY WITH LAB

Chemistry represents the science of matter, especially its chemical reactions, but also its composition, structure and properties. Chemistry is concerned with atoms and their interactions with other atoms, and particularly with the properties of chemical bonds.

PHY 110 – PHYSICS WITH LAB I

Physics is a natural science that involves the study of matter and its motion through space and time, along with related concepts such as energy and force. More broadly, it is the general analysis of nature, conducted in order to understand how the universe behaves. The amalgamation of physics & chemistry seeks to open minds, bridge gaps, enlighten minds and change attitudes about life, the environment, the planet and the universe at large.

ENG 111 – ENGLISH COMPOSITION

For students to negotiate successfully the environment in which they work and play, it is critical that they develop language skills that will help them to understand what they listen to, view and read, and to respond effectively in speech, writing and other expressive media.


Students must be exposed to language activities, which allow them to communicate confidently and effectively in a variety of settings and situations. These activities will also allow them to explore social, cultural and moral values and appreciate the aesthetic appeal and power of language. The course covered by this syllabus is designed to encourage a wide range of teaching strategies. It takes full account of the varied learning styles of students and recognizes the value of catering to multiple intelligences. The syllabus emphasizes the acquisition of communicative skills and is conducted in a student-centered, activity-based environment, which makes use of students’ experiences and simulates real life situations for the practice of the language. The program stresses careful attention to the processes involved in the development of the language skills and provides scope for integration across the curriculum.

This course is intended to produce students who:

  • Use language effectively for the purpose of communication in social, academic and hospital work environments 
  • Recognize, interpret and respond to ideas presented through different media 
  • Develop competence and confidence in their use of language across the curriculum
  • Are motivated to read for pleasure and for the development of self and community

MAT 103 – MATHEMATICS

The Mathematics course of study will provide students with the knowledge and skill sets required to model practical situations and provide workable solutions in their respective field of study. These skills include critical and creative thinking, problem solving, and logical reasoning, modeling ability, teamwork, decision-making, research techniques, information communication and technological competencies for life-long learning. Such holistic development becomes useful for the transition into research and further studies required at any levels of study. Moreover, the attitude and discipline, which accompany the study of Mathematics, also nurture desirable character qualities.


This course aims to:

  • Provide students with the proficiencies required modeling practical situations and providing workable solutions in the medical field for work and study;
  • Improve on the mathematical knowledge, skills and techniques with an emphasis on accuracy 
  • Empower students with the knowledge, competencies and attitudes, which are precursors for academia as well as quality leadership for sustainability in the dynamic world

PCAL 102 – PRE CALCULUS

Pre-Med II: Anatomy, Psychology & More

Students of Windsor University School of Medicine will build on the foundations of Pre-Med I in our Pred-Med II curriculum. These courses deliver an understanding of basic anatomy, psychology, physiology and more. Contact our office, or download our brochure to learn more.

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CMB 110 – CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY WITH LAB I

This course provides an opportunity for the student to distinguish the molecular basis of cellular processes and interrelationships in living systems with an emphasis on eukaryotic systems.

This course teaches the student the introductory “language” and “dictionary” of molecular cell biology.

It also provides fundamental insights for the student to initiate and further develop the process of inquiry-based learning and discovery in science.

This course also establishes the basic skills to allow the student to explore and assess their interests in the fields of molecular and cellular sciences for career opportunities.

More importantly this course will provide the student with fundamental knowledge to facilitate the systematic process of problem solving in molecular and cell biology.

IOC 106 – INORGANIC CHEMISTRY WITH LAB

This course will focus on the molecular structures and properties of inorganic complexes and compounds. We will study concepts in bonding, trends in periodic properties, molecular symmetry and its relationship to spectra, solid-state, reaction mechanisms, coordination chemistry, and descriptive chemistry of selected elements.

CAL 109 – CALCULUS

Topics include the limits of functions, derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and their inverses and the definite integral and its application to area problems. Also included are applications of the derivative including maximum and minimum problems, and curve sketching using calculus. Also, applications of integration (such as volume, arc length, work, and average value), techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, infinite series, polar coordinates, and parametric equations are included.


  • By the end of this course, students should:
  • Understand functions and their limits graphically and algebraically. 
  • Be able to apply different methodologies to solving limits including graphically, algebraically, and using the epsilon-delta definition. 
  • Understand and be able to apply different integration techniques.
  • Be able to solve functions of several variables and partial differentiation.
  • Be able to solve multiple integrals.

OCHM 107 – ORGANIC CHEMISTRY WITH LAB I

The first of part describes the chemistry of hydrocarbon-based compounds.

Specific topics to be covered include structure, nomenclature, stereochemistry, and reactivity of various Organic compounds including: alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkyl halides, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols and ethers.


The importance of understanding and writing detailed mechanisms will be emphasized throughout the course.

HMDP 201 – HISTORY OF MEDICINE I AND DPC-I

This course offers an introductory of the history of medicine (principally in Europe and the United States) from classical antiquity to the early twentieth century. Using a combination of both primary and secondary sources, we will learn about the “Hippocratic Heritage” of contemporary western medicine; medicine in late antiquity; faith and healing in the medieval period; medicine and knowledge in the Islamic world; medicine during the Renaissance (particularly the rise of the mechanical philosophy); medicine in the age of Enlightenment; professionalization, women-doctors and midwives, and battles over ‘quackery’ in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; the role of medicine in colonialism and empire; and the promises and perils of modern medicine (dramatic decreases in mortality on the one hand, the rise of Eugenics and the importance of Medicine to the National Socialist State on the other). Medical terminology is the study of the principles of medical word building to help the student develop the extensive medical vocabulary used in health care occupations. Students receive a thorough grounding in basic medical terminology through a study of root words, prefixes and suffixes. The study focuses on correct pronunciation, spelling and use of medical terms. Anatomy, physiology, and pathology of disease are discussed yet no previous knowledge of these topics is necessary.

PHY 112 – PHYSICS WITH LAB II

Pre-Med III: Understanding Basic Medical Sciences

Windsor University School of Medicine’s Pre-Med III program gives students the opportunity to continue a well-rounded medical education. To learn more and begin your medical education, enroll today.

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BOST 203 – BIOSTATISTICS


In this introductory statistics course we will explore the use of statistical methodology in designing, analyzing, interpreting, and presenting biological experiments and observations. We will cover descriptive statistics, elements of experimental design, probability, hypothesis testing and statistical inference, analysis of variance, correlation, regression techniques, and non-parametric statistical methods. Throughout the course the application of statistical techniques within a biological context will be emphasized, using data from laboratory and field studies.

OCHM 205 – ORGANIC CHEMISTRY WITH LAB II

Organic Chemistry II, covers the second-half of Organic Chemistry which includes the structure and reactivity of organometallic compounds, radicals, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, emulates and related compounds, aromatic systems, amines and heterocyclic compounds. In addition, modern methods and techniques in organic structure elucidation (NMR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry) will be introduced and discussed.

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Use the IUPAC system to name an organic compound containing multiple functional groups.
  • Predict the physical properties of organic chemicals based on their structures, such as relative boiling point, melting point, solubility, etc. 
  • Understanding the structure and general type of reactions of organic molecules/organic intermediates, such as organometallic compounds, radicals, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, emulates and related compounds, aromatic systems, amines and heterocyclic compounds.
  • Determine the structure of an organic molecule using a combination of IR, 1H and 13C NMR, and Mass Spectrum.

EPD 206 – ETHICS AND DPC II (DOCTOR PATIENT COMMUNICATIONS II)


The study of Medical Ethics, by the very nature of its subject, concepts, issues, and manner of inquiry promotes open inquiry from a variety of perspectives. In the contemporary context, emerging biomedical technologies, policies, and practices raise some of the most pressing and significant philosophical challenges that we face as a society, returning us to the perennial philosophical question of “the good life.” In analyzing the legal, moral, and philosophical debates that shape current public discourse on a series of controversial topics, this course trains students to approach complex moral issues with analytical precision, moral concern, and reflective judgment. This involves carefully attending to a range of theoretical positions in dialogue with concrete situations and particular contexts.

FNU 209 – FOOD, NUTRITION AND HEALTH


In the light of increasing nutrition-related illnesses in the world, it is necessary to find new ways to empower individuals and communities to exercise control over their health. Proper nutrition practices hold the key to the prevention and treatment of the chronic degenerative diseases that affect families globally. It is now well established that the achievement and maintenance of optimal physical and mental health, and the prevention of disease, are integral to the economic and social development of the people around the world. The integration of preventive and therapeutic nutrition into contemporary health care and food production and service is pivotal to this process.

Food and Nutrition involves the study of food and its relation to health. The primary focus of the subject is the raising of standards in food science, food preparation and service. The syllabus seeks to change attitudes and to improve the health status of both the individual and the community.

HUM 210 – HUMANITIES


This class is designed as a project-based, fully integrated humanities class. The purpose of the humanities course is to develop greater understanding of a global society. Students will collaborate to develop academic skills necessary for career and success in the 21st century.

Objective: The objective of this course is to help you meet the Common Core Standards for History and the English-Language Arts in reading, writing English language conventions, listening, and speaking. Through purposeful learning experiences you will develop the skills necessary to master grade-level content and grow as a learner. Growing and learning require sincere effort, and we encourage you to do your best and attain excellence.

End of the course students should be able to:


  • Think critically and creatively in learning and life.
  • Produce various forms of effective communication.
  • Productively interact within collaborative environments for learning and problem solving.

CMB 202 – CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY WITH LAB II

Pre-Med IV: Hands-On Experience in Biology, Chemistry & More

With the completion of Windsor University School of Medicine’s Pre-Med IV curriculum, our students should find themselves well-prepared for our intensive MD courses. Download our brochure to learn more about our program offerings and St. Kitts campus, or call us today.

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PSY 302 – INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

The Psychology course is an introduction to the main fields and theories in Psychology and their respective theorists. This course will require that the students objectively analyze the contribution of these theorists and the implications of their theories. The course content includes the biology of behavior, learning, memory, cognition, motivation, emotion, personality, and abnormal behavior and its therapies, social behavior and individual differences. The course includes coverage of dealing effectively with the demands of everyday life, interpersonal relationships, and approaches to personal growth.

MIIM 303 – INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY

Basic Microbiology explores the diversity of microorganisms, their cellular biology, growth & nutrition, metabolism, genetics and microbial control. Level of exposure to medical Microbiology in premedical curriculum is basic, simplified and minimal compared to MD.

Microbiology curriculum. Students are expected to understand the key terminology, basic concepts and one common clinical example.

Medicine is an ever-changing science. As new research and clinical experience broaden our knowledge, changes in treatment and drug therapy are required.

BIOC 305 – INTRODUCTION TO BIOCHEMISTRY

The Basic Biochemistry course is designed to prepare the student for understanding the basic cellular mechanisms that enable us to survive.

Biochemistry is the chemistry of life. The major objective of this module is to enable students understand the molecular level of all of the chemical processes in living cells and their abnormalities. All disease has some biochemical basis. A sound knowledge in Biochemistry is essential for other disciplines like Physiology, Pharmacology and Microbiology. Most of the recent advances in modern medicine have been possible with the insight into the molecular basis of the diseases.

MTHM 306 – MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY / HISTORY OF MEDICINE II

This course offers an introductory of the history of medicine (principally in Europe and the United States) from classical antiquity to the early twentieth century. Using a combination of both primary and secondary sources, we will learn about the “Hippocratic Heritage” of contemporary western medicine; medicine in late antiquity; faith and healing in the medieval period; medicine and knowledge in the Islamic world; medicine during the Renaissance (particularly the rise of the mechanical philosophy); medicine in the age of Enlightenment; professionalization, women-doctors and midwives, and battles over ‘quackery’ in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; the role of medicine in colonialism and empire; and the promises and perils of modern medicine (dramatic decreases in mortality on the one hand, the rise of Eugenics and the importance of Medicine to the National Socialist State on the other).

Medical terminology is the study of the principles of medical word building to help the student develop the extensive medical vocabulary used in health care occupations. Students receive a thorough grounding in basic medical terminology through a study of root words, prefixes and suffixes. The study focuses on correct pronunciation, spelling and use of medical terms. Anatomy, physiology, and pathology of disease are discussed yet no previous knowledge of these topics is necessary.

ANPHY 301 – INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

GNNU 304 – INTRODUCTION TO GENETICS AND NUTRITION

St. Kitts Campus

Windsor University School of Medicine
P.O.Box 1621
Brighton’s Estate, Cayon
St. Kitts, West Indies
Tel 1-869-466-1220 / 6157

708-587-0047 / 0067
Fax 1-869-465-0593

Email admin@windsor.edu

U.S. Information Office
6212, Monee Manhattan Rd
Monee Illinois, 60449

Tel 708-235-1940

Fax 708-235-1942

Email usadmin@windsor.edu

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